A survey of Room Correction devices – Meridian, TacT, Lyngdorf

In the next couple of articles I’m going to create a comprehensive directory of the room correction products available on the market and assess them against the functional criteria that have been explained in the last two articles (here and here).

The functional criteria have been shortened to fit into the table. Here is the interpretive legend:

  • Choose Freq –> Must not apply correction filters above the transition frequency OR must allow the user to switch off room correction above the transition frequency
  • Choose Target –> Must allow the user to choose a target frequency response
  • No A/D or D/A –> Must not perform an un-needed analog to digital or digital to analog conversion
  • Auto Measure –> Must provide automatic measurement and correction filter generation capabilities

If you didn’t read the detailed and comprehensive introduction to room correction, see this article.

Manufacturer

Model

Choose Freq

Chooose Target

No A/D or D/A

Auto Measure

Meridian

861 Multi-Channel Processor

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Meridian

G65 Multi-Channel Processor

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TacT

TCS MkIII 12-Channel Processor [DISCONTINUED]

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TacT

RCS 2.2 XP / Mini [DISCONTINUED](1)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TacT

M/S 2150 XDM [DISCONTINUED] (2)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TacT

Boz 216 [DISCONTINUED] (3)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Lyngdorf

DPA-1 Pre-amplifier

Yes

Limited (i)

Yes

Yes

Lyngdorf

RP-1 Standalone room correction device

Yes

Limited (i)

No

Yes

Lyngdorf

TDAI2170 Integrated ampifier

Yes

Limited (i)

Yes

Yes

Notes:

Interestingly Meridian does not have a 2 channel device incorporating its Meridian Room Correction algorithms.

(1) The RCS 2.2 XP provides analog inputs whereas the 2.2 Mini is digital input only.

(2) The only difference between the M and S models appears to be the addition of a volume control wheel in the M model.

(3) The Boz line is modular, in that it can be extended to provide up to 16 channels of digital amplification. The 216 is the preamp and also a controller for all the other digital amplifiers.

(i) The Lyngdorf products do not offer complete flexibility in choice of target curve, instead offering what they call Voicing curves. Whilst the curves offered do not provide complete end-user flexibility, and some are slightly strange (6 dB cut above 100Hz anyone?!), I imagine they have done this to prevent user error (e.g. setting a curve with a 20dB peak).

Next week I’ll cover some of the other products on the market from Audyssey, Velodyne and DSPeaker.

What do you think? Let me know, as always, via the comments!

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